2.20.2017

Rating Canada's Federal Political Parties

Liberals – F

Justin Trudeau, Leader – F (there isn’t a lower grade)

No surprise.  Here’s a group of misfits pushing a radically ideological set of policies, led by the son of a former Prime Minister whose public image is that of a male bimbo.  So far appearing crazier than a hypothetical New Democrat Party government, Justin Trudeau is the swoon-inducing face of the Establishment cabal.  Open borders, new and higher taxes, and a continued obsession with the dying globalism movement are the markers of this government.  From kool-aid drinking Environment Minister Catherine McKenna to Mimbo Justin to weirdo Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland to Sharia evangelist MP Iqra Khalid, this gong-show of a governing group would be a standard Monty Python sketch if they weren’t so dangerous.


Conservatives – C+

Rona Ambrose, interim Leader – B

As the Official Opposition to the group above, the Conservatives have been frustratingly ineffective and oddly silent, given the target-rich environment located across from them in the House of Commons.  Yes, the party is in the midst of a leadership contest which has naturally taken some of their focus away from Parliamentary business, but given the more-than-horrible moves being made by Justin’s group, Canadians are becoming as disillusioned with the Conservatives as they are worried about the Liberal government.  For her part, interim leader Ambrose has done an admirable job keeping the seat warm for the next leader, but outside of a few notably effective MPs, she hasn’t had much support.  One only need look at the recent attack on free speech called M103 – the so-called ‘anti-Islamophobia’ motion – to see evidence that the Conservatives appear MIA.  The push-back against the motion was created by Canadians on social media who directly questioned Conservative leadership candidates, then Tory MPs, on their individual position.  Only then did (some) MPs begin to speak out.  The truth is, the Conservatives could be, and should be, doing a far better job.


New Democratic Party – D

Tom Mulcair – C-

Where has Tom been?  While we are light-years apart on almost every issue, I always enjoyed watching Tom rant and rave.   Perhaps coming off the election where some in the MSM predicted the first federal NDP government in our history only to end up with another disappointing third-place finish took the wind out of the sails.  Maybe it is confusion as their MPs sit and watch Trudeau’s Liberals lift their policies and expand them to outrageous extremes.  Whatever the cause, the usual rabble-rousers have been unusually quiet.  Of course, with Tom losing a leadership review and a party election being scheduled for October of this year, it is understandable that the party would be in a ‘going through the motions’ phase.  And given the Liberal’s penchant for pushing ultra-progressivism on Canadians, Dippers probably feel their work is being done for them.


Bloc Quebecois – D-

Rheal Fortin, interim Leader – F

Hands up: who out there has ever heard of Rheal Fortin?  A party searching for more than just their next leader, the BQ is also searching for relevance.  In a downtime for sentiments of Quebec sovereignty, the BQ is truly a party without a purpose.  A new leader simply won’t change that.  With a current Francophone PM pushing a far-left agenda, French-Canadians have little to bitch about on the federal level.  The Bloc has always been an anomaly on the federal political stage, and like most anomalies, have a shelf-life which the party is rapidly reaching, if they haven’t already.


Green Party – F

Elizabeth May – F

Seriously, it’s almost embarrassing that I have to include this party.  Led by born-with-a-silver-spoon-in-her-mouth American Elizabeth May, this group is truly the place to go for low-info weirdoes with no other party to go to.  If the Bloc Quebecois is a one-province party, the Greens are a one-constituency party.  The only possible positive which could be said about this gang is that they do provide a bit of comic relief from the monotony of Canadian politics.


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